AVIATION PRINTS .CO.UK

THE ONE STOP AVIATION GALLERY FOR AVIATION ART PRINTS AND PAINTINGS BY LEADING AVIATION ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Aviation prints, the number one aviation website based in the United Kingdom. Our huge stock of aviation art by the world's leading aviation artists Robert Taylor, David Pentland, Ivan Berryman, Anthony Saunders, Simon Smith, Philip West,  Graeme Lothian, Nicholas Trudgian, Frank Wootton, Barry Price, Ronald Wong, Keith Hill, Ray Garner, Michael Rondot, Michael Turner, Geoff Lea, and Tim Fisher, is ready for immediate dispatch. Our range includes aviation art prints of the Royal Air Force, German Air Force, US Air Force and aircraft from other countries.

 


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Publishing historical art since 1985

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FEATURED ARTISTS

Ivan Berryman Robert Taylor
Gerald Coulson David Pentland
Nicolas Trudgian Graeme Lothian
Brian Bateman Anthony Saunders

FEATURED SIGNATURE

Flt Lt Wally MacFarlane DFC

Pilot with 76 Squadron and completed 31 Operations through 1944-45 and during this time met his wife who was a WAAF Signals Officer in the Squadron.

Click for artwork signed by this pilot

 

 

CLEARANCE AVIATION ART

This Week's Clearance Aviation Art

A Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm Sea Harrier turns to release its Sidewinder missiles at an Argentinean Airforce Dagger as it beats a hasty retreat after a near miss on Sir Bedivere and HMS Fearless in San Carlos Sound during the 1982 Falklands Islands conflict.

Action Over San Carlos by Geoff Lea.
£60.00
The crew of Lynx (pilot, Royal Electrical Mechanical Engineer and Door Gunner) prepare for a mission.

Aldergrove Dispersal by John Wynne Hopkins.
£50.00
 A sight never to be repeated. Concorde G-BOAE gracefully drifts above London with Buckingham Palace immediately below, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the River Thames and the London Eye in the middle distance. On 24th October 2003, the world said goodbye to this elegant airliner, bringing to a close almost thirty years of commercial supersonic travel.

Concorde over London by Ivan Berryman.
£50.00
 Of all the big piston-engined navy fighters built after WWll, the Hawker Sea Fury was the greatest.Rugged, powerful and fast, the formidable Sea Fury achieved fame over Korea in both fighter and ground attack roles and was the last of the line of piston-engined Fleet Air Arm fighters.

Testing Times by Michael Rondot.
£40.00

 Lynx Mk7 deplanes chalk, South Armagh.

Eagle Patrol by John Wynne Hopkins.
£50.00
 In the narrow valley dominated by the 3000 metre high Mt Glarnish the Patrouille Suisse Tigers line up over the runway of the satellite airfield of Mollis as solo Paul Thoma streaks underneath in the dramatic <i>Tunnel</i> manoeuvre.

The Mollis Tunnel by Robert Tomlin.
£40.00
 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Silver Kite 211 by Philip West.
£65.00
 Australian Ace Dick Cresswell tangles with a Japanese Zero in the humid air of the tropics over New Guinea during an encounter in 1942. Flying a P-40E Kittyhawk with the insignia of 77 Squadron, RAAF blazoned on his aircraft, Cresswell makes a head-on pass leaving the enemy aircraft streaming smoke. Immortalised by the Flying Tigers, the P-40 was a fine combat aircraft that operated in the Pacific, European and Middle East theaters.

Combat Over New Guinea by Nicolas Trudgian.
£55.00

FEATURED AIRCRAFT

Me163

Rocket-powered Me-163 Comet, probably the most technically advanced aircraft of the second world war. Out of necessity, German aircraft designers compressed decades of development time into years or often months. Although it did not play a significant role in combat, the 163 represented a radical departure from conventional aircraft design. With a length of only 19 feet, the diminutive 163 was powered by a liquid fuel rocket engine. The production models of the Comet were fueled with a mixture of C-Stoff (a mixture of 57% methyl alcohol, 13% hydrazine hydrate, and 13% water) and T-Stoff which was 80% hydrogen peroxide. Almost 5000 pounds of fuel were carried, but the Comets engine had a burn time of only a few minutes. Many technological breakthroughs were required for the Comet program to succeed. Because space and weight were so critical, use of a conventional landing gear was not possible. Instead the 163 utilized a simple dolly consisting of an axle and two wheels which was jettisoned upon takeoff. For landing the 163 utilized a sturdy retractable skid with hydraulic shock absorbers. The Comet was also not particularly effective in combat despite its 596-MPH top speed and twin canon. The aircraft had only about 150 seconds of power once it reached altitude. Thereafter it became a very fast glider. Allied pilots learned to exploit the 163s vulnerability during landing. Rudolf Opitz, the Chief Test Pilot on the 163, was a central figure in the development and testing of the 163. Rudy met Herman Goering once at a special airshow for high ranking military and government officials. The few remaining 163s to survive the War are due to the efforts of Rudy to preserve this unique aircraft for aviation posterity.

Click for artwork of this aircraft

LATEST AVIATION RELEASES

 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (PC)
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

This Week's Half Price Offers

 Boeing B29 Superfortresses of the USAAF 40th Bomb Group come under attack from a Kawasaki Ki64 Hein (Tony) of the Japanese Army Airforces 244th Sentai.

Mission to Yokohama, Japan, June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Outward bound, Stirling III of 199 Squadron based at Lakenheath, Suffolk, heads out on another night of operations in August 1943.  EE953, Sqd letters EX - E of 100 group is piloted by F/L Tom Austin DFC who finished his tour by the end of October 1944, winning the DFC with his bomb aimer F/O Jack Lawrence.  Nicknamed the Queen of the Skies, the Stirling was the 1st four engined bomber to enter service with the RAF in 1941.  The cockpit stood a massive 22.5 feet from the ground and had an operational ceiling of only 12,000 feet, well within the range of the enemy AA guns.  By September 1944 other bombers were taking the brunt of the attack to the Germans and the Stirlings were used mainly for glider towing especially for D-day and Arnhem.

Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
 Messerschmitts from Stabb 111/JG53 patrolling over Germany in the last days of WW2, piloted by Lt. Bernard Ernst Dieter April 1945.
Bf109 K-4 by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Albatros C.III C.766/16 was among the most distinctively-painted aircraft of World War 1, its fuselage sides decorated with a dragon motif on the starboard side and a stylised crocodile on the other, both apparently chasing a tiny white biplane. This was the aircraft shared by Erwin Bohme and his observer, Leutnant Ladermacher while serving with Jasta 10 on the Eastern Front in August 1916. Bohme was soon chosen to fly with the great Oswald Boelke with Jasta 2, the latter being tragically killed in a collision with Bohme on 28th October during an aerial combat with DH.2s of 24 Sqn. This tragedy haunted Bohme for many months to come, but he went on to score 24 confirmed victories before falling victim to an FK.8 on 29th September 1917. Their Albatros C.III is shown picking off a Russian Nieuport 12, his first kill on 2nd August 1916.

Leutnant der Reserve Erwin Bohme by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 For Manfred von Richthofen, the air battle in the skies west of Amiens on 20th April 1918 was to yield a final two victories to add to the seventy eight with which he was already credited.  But these were to be his last, the Red Baron finally succumbing the following day.  Just moments before Second Lieutenant David Lewis' 3 Sqn Sopwith Camel fell to the German's guns (the young pilot surviving to tell his story of being the Red Baron's final victim), Major Richard Raymond-Barker was not so lucky, his aircraft burning furiously until it hit the ground in a fireball near the Forest of Hamel.

The 79th Victory by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £65.00
Douglas C47 Dakotas fly into the landing and drop zone at Renkum Heath, September 17th 1944.

Arnhem by Simon Smith (D)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £95.00
 The distinctive blue and red livery of these two Albatros D.Vs identify them as Jasta 18 machines in Berthold Colours, a reference to their commander at that time, Oblt Rudolf Berthold. The nearest aircraft is that of Leutnant der Reserve Paul Strahle who scored six victories with this unit before taking his aircraft (4594/17) with him to Jasta 57 where he would score a further 8. Each aircraft carried a personal emblem, in the case of Strahle a white axe whilst the similar aircraft of Ltn d R Arthur Rahn displays a diamond pattern. The fuselage crosses on both aircraft were crudely painted over and are still just visible beneath the blue.

Leutnant d R Paul Strahle by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

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TOP AIRCRAFT

Spitfire

The operational history of the Spitfire with the Royal Air Force started with the first Mark 1 Spitfire K9789, which entered service with 19th Squadron RAF at Duxford Airfield on 4th August 1938. The Spitfire achieved legendary status during the Battle of Britain, a reputation aided by the famous Spitfire Fund organised and run by Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry of aircraft production. 
Although the key aim of Fighter Command was to stop the Luftwaffes bombers, in practice the tactic was to use Spitfires to counter German escort fighters, particularly the Bf109s, while the Hurricane squadrons attacked the bombers. Well known Spitfire pilots included Johnnie Johnson (34 enemy aircraft shot down), who flew the Spitfire right through his operational career from late 1940 to 1945, John Freeborn, Douglas Bader, Robert Standford-Tuck, Maurice Brown who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes during the major air battles of 1940. Some notable Commonwealth pilots were Canadian George Beurling with 31.33 victories, South African Pilot A G Sailor Malan with 27 victories and Alan Deere from New Zealand with 17 victories. The Spitfire continued to play increasingly diverse roles throughout the Second World War and beyond, often in air forces other than the RAF. The Spitfire, for example, became the first high-speed photo reconnaissance aircraft to be operated by the RAF. Sometimes unarmed, they flew at high, medium and low altitudes, often ranging far into enemy territory to closely observe the Axis powers and provide an almost continual flow of valuable intelligence information throughout the war. In 1941 and 1942, PRU Spitfires provided the first photographs of the Freya and Würzburg systems and, in 1943, helped confirm that the Germans were building the V1 and V2. In the Mediterranean the Spitfire blunted the attacks on Malta by the Italian Regia Aeronautica and German Luftwaffe and, from early 1943, helped pave the way for the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy. On 7th March 1942, 15 Mk Vs carrying 90-gallon fuel tanks under their bellies took off from HMS Eagle off the coast of Algeria on a 600-mile flight to Malta. Those Spitfires were the first to see service outside Britain. During WWII, Spitfires were used by the USAAF in the 4th Fighter Squadron until replaced by P-47 Thunderbolts in March 1943.
Lancaster Me262 Spitfire Mustang
Hurricane Me109 Flying Fortress Fw190

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AIRCRAFT

Spitfire
Mustang
Me109
Lancaster
Hurricane
Flying Fortress
Fw190

New Aviation Packs
Mosquito Aviation Art Print Pack.
Mosquitos

Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.
Night

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman.
Save £230!
Classic Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Hurricane

Hurricane Heroes by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £260!
WW2 RAF Fighter Aircraft Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Holding

Holding the Line - The Battle of Britain by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £260!
Dambusters 70th Anniversary Double Remarques by Anthony Saunders.
Final

Final Briefing by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
The

The Breach by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
Save £225!
Saunders Roe Jet Aircraft Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman.
Saro

Saro SR.A1 Over the Needles by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Saro

Saro Sr.53 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Save £120!

Welcome to Aviation Prints .co.uk!  Use our drop down menus to find a particular aircraft, artist or signature, or click the links to the most popular in each category which we have provided above.  Browse through over 80 aviation artists, 120 different aircraft and well over 1500 aviation pilot and aircrew signatures.  Look out for our specially discounted two-print packs - especially designed for aviation art collectors, our packs bring together prints with the same aircraft, squadron, event or similar collectable signatures and offer large discounts off some of the latest releases and most popular prints.

At Aviation Prints .co.uk we hold 99% of the items advertised on our website in stock - our warehouse contains more stock than any other aviation art dealer, and we have over 1,000 print editions which are unavailable anywhere else.  We invest in aviation art by publishing artwork by a number of aviation artists ourselves - and we are also authorised distributors for other aviation art publishers, making our range of artwork the largest available.  With over 24 years of experience in the field of fine art, you can find the best deals around on aviation art at Aviation Prints .co.uk!

 

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