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AVIATION PRINTS .CO.UK

THE ONE STOP AVIATION GALLERY FOR AVIATION ART PRINTS AND PAINTINGS BY LEADING AVIATION ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Aviation prints, the number one aviation website based in the United Kingdom. Our huge stock of aviation art by the world's leading aviation artists Robert Taylor, David Pentland, Ivan Berryman, Anthony Saunders, Simon Smith, Philip West,  Graeme Lothian, Nicholas Trudgian, Frank Wootton, Barry Price, Ronald Wong, Keith Hill, Ray Garner, Michael Rondot, Michael Turner, Geoff Lea, and Tim Fisher, is ready for immediate dispatch. Our range includes aviation art prints of the Royal Air Force, German Air Force, US Air Force and aircraft from other countries.

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

NEW - Aviation Art Postcards

Click for full list!

FEATURED ARTISTS

Ivan Berryman Robert Taylor
Gerald Coulson David Pentland
Nicolas Trudgian Graeme Lothian
Brian Bateman Anthony Saunders

FEATURED SIGNATURE

Warrant Officer Reg Payne

Having completed his training as a WOP/Air Gunner he joined 50 Sqn on Lancasters in the same crew as Marshal of the RAF Sir Michael Beetham. With this crew he completed over 30 ops including 10 to Berlin.

Click for artwork signed by this pilot

 

 

CLEARANCE AVIATION ART

This Week's Clearance Aviation Art

 A damaged Boeing B-17G of the 510th Bomb Squadron, 351st Bomb Group operating out of Polebrook, Northants, escorted here by North American P-51Ds of the 357th Fighter Group from Leiston in Suffolk.

Favorite Lady by John Young.
£40.00
 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.

Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman.
£40.00
 A pair of F18 Hornets overfly the Nimitz-class carrier USS Dwight Eisenhower (CV-69) with the surface combatant USS Arleigh Burke (DDF-51) off her port bow.

USS Dwight Eisenhower by Ivan Berryman.
£50.00
 It required more than a little nerve to fly a fighter into the barrage of fire sprayed out by the gunners of a box of B17 bombers; it took even greater courage to do so in the rocket propelled Me163 Komet.  With rocket science still in its infancy, these small aircraft were still in the experimental stage, and piloting what amounted to a flying bomb was in itself a perilous business, let alone flying them into combat.  But these were desperate times.  The day and night bombing assault on Germany was bringing the mighty war machine to its knees, and aything that might help stem the tide was thrown into battle.  Powered by a mixture of two highly volatile chemicals, the slightest leak, or heavy landing could cause a huge explosion, and the mix was so corrosive that in the event of even a minor accident, the pilot could literally be dissolved.  Sitting in a cramped cockpit, surrounded by dangerous chemicals and ammunition, the intrepid aviator would be launched into the sky on what was, at best, a four minute mission.  After, hopefully, engaing the enemy, he would glide powerlessly back to the nearest airfield to be refuelled so as to attempt the hazardous operation all over again.  Though limited to a handful of victories, the Komet did make the Allied crews wonder what else the Luftwaffe had hidden up its sleeve, and had the distinction of being the forerunner of aircraft technology that eventually took aircraft into space.  Capable of nearly 600mph and climbing to 30,000ft in less than two minutes, this tiny rocket propelled Me163 Komet was typical of Germanys ingenuity in its desperate attempts to stem the havoc being wreaked by the USAAFs daylight bombers.

Rocket Attack by Nicolas Trudgian.
£80.00

US Air Force F15 Eagle over flys British Challenger Tank during the Gulf War.

Gulf Buddies by Geoff Lea.
£40.00
 Spitfires of 602 City of Glasgow Squadron in the disitnctive white stripe marking of the d- day invasion patrol the Normandy beaches.  Seen below are the landing craft and ships of the invasion force as the troops form Britian, America, Canada invade the Normandy Beaches, coded Juno. Gold, Sword and Utah.
Beware of the Lion by Geoff Lea.
£31.00
A Vulcan Mk B2 of 44 sqn lifting off into the dawn sky during the cold war. 44 sqn were the first equipped with these aircraft in 1960, initially receiving the earlier Mk 1As passed on from 83 and 617 sqns who had upgraded to the B2 as the Mk 1A was phased out. It was in fact the last squadron to use them, seeing active service in the bombing of Port Stanley during the Falklands war and finally relinquishing them in 1984.

Deterrent at Dawn by Keith Woodcock.
£65.00
 Spitfire Mk9. of 56 squadron patrol the D-Day landings.

Normandy Beach Head Patrol by Geoff Lea.
£50.00

FEATURED AIRCRAFT

RE8

The Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8 was a British two-seat biplane reconnaissance and bomber aircraft of the Great War. The first of two prototype R.E.8s (Reconnaissance Experimental 8) flew on 17 June 1916. The first production aircraft reached th front line squadrons in November 1916. The R.E.8 was difficult to fly, and was regarded with great suspicion at first in the Royal Flying Corps. Although eventually it gave reasonably satisfactory service, it was never an outstanding combat aircraft. In spite of this, the R.E.8 served as the standard British reconnaissance and artillery spotting aircraft from mid-1917 to the end of the war, serving alongside the rather more popular Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8. Over 4,000 R.E.8s were eventually produced and they served in most theatres including Italy, Russia, Palestine and Mesopotamia, as well as the Western Front. In addition to the Royal Aircraft Factory, the R.E.8 was produced by six other companies including Austin Motors, Standard Motors, Siddeley-Deasy and Coventry Ordnance Works

Click for artwork of this aircraft

LATEST AVIATION RELEASES

 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.
Tiger Moth G-AOEI owned by Cambridge Flying Group over the Cambridge countryside.

A Special Breed by Gerald Coulson.

This Week's Half Price Offers

 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Bathed in the low winter sun over southern England, Gotha G.V.s are attacked by defending Sopwith Camels as the German bombers penetrate the south-eastern counties en route to London.  This was, effectively, the first Battle of Britain, staged during the winter of 1917/18, during which the intruders were frequently repelled, their bomb loads falling harmlessly on English soil.

Gotha G. V. by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The terrible battles that raged between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian armies on the Piave river in Northern Italy in June 1918 had already claimed many thousands of lives on both sides, but as the Italians drove the Austro-Hungarians back, things were to take a defining turn for the worse, as torrential rain and melting snow caused the river to flood, sweeping away bridges, boats and men alike.  The Italians continued to bombard their retreating enemy and rake them with machine gun fire as they tried to cross.  Italian and Allied aircraft too joined in the ruthless destruction of the beaten Austro-Hungarian forces and soon only one pontoon bridge remained. On 20th June, an Italian SIA.7b attempted to bomb this final lifeline, but its efforts were thwarted by the red Albatros D.III (Oef) of Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski who immediately downed the intruder to claim his 35th - and final - confirmed victory, despite his own aircraft being hit no less than 37 times. An estimated 60,000 Austro-Hungarian troops are believed to have perished during the retreat across the Piave, surely one of WW1's most tragic episodes.

The Last Victory by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £260.00
 Prior to the British attack on the Italian battle fleet moored in Taranto Harbour in November 1940, the job of obtaining the very latest photo reconnaissance fell to the maverick pilot Adrian 'Warby' Warburton.  Flying a requisitioned Martin Maryland, Warburton undertook a series of breathtakingly low level passes across the ships moored in the harbour, cheating a hail of anti aircraft fire and flak to bring home the vital information to Rear Admiral Lumley Lyster, the flag officer aboard HMS Illustrious.  Ships shown moored in the Mar Grande here are Vittorio Veneto (nearest) and Littorio with Duilio and Giulio Cesare in the background.

Prelude to Taranto by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Based upon the design of an earlier 1913 racing biplane, Aviatik AG were able to introduce their B.1 into military service almost at the outbreak of World War 1, the type proving to be a useful reconnaissance machine during the early stages of the conflict. As with most B type aircraft of this time, the Aviatik B.1 was unarmed and carried an observer in the forward cockpit. Power was provided by a Mercedes D.1 inline engine whose large radiators were fitted to the port side of the fuselage, just above the lower wing. There is no record of exactly how many B.1s were constructed.

Aviatik B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
  In Gerald Coulsons fine study First Light, Mk Vb Spitfires of 92 Squadron climb out of Biggin Hill at the outset of an early morning patrol on a cold winters morning in February 1941. Leaving the mist behind as the first beams of light streak across the heavens, they will turn to the east and steel themselves to meet the enemy, high in the dawn sky.

First Light by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Phantom II of US Marine Corps, VMFA-531 (Grey Ghosts) Vietnam, Danang April 1965.

Phantom II by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 

TOP AIRCRAFT

Spitfire

The operational history of the Spitfire with the Royal Air Force started with the first Mark 1 Spitfire K9789, which entered service with 19th Squadron RAF at Duxford Airfield on 4th August 1938. The Spitfire achieved legendary status during the Battle of Britain, a reputation aided by the famous Spitfire Fund organised and run by Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry of aircraft production. 
Although the key aim of Fighter Command was to stop the Luftwaffes bombers, in practice the tactic was to use Spitfires to counter German escort fighters, particularly the Bf109s, while the Hurricane squadrons attacked the bombers. Well known Spitfire pilots included Johnnie Johnson (34 enemy aircraft shot down), who flew the Spitfire right through his operational career from late 1940 to 1945, John Freeborn, Douglas Bader, Robert Standford-Tuck, Maurice Brown who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes during the major air battles of 1940. Some notable Commonwealth pilots were Canadian George Beurling with 31.33 victories, South African Pilot A G Sailor Malan with 27 victories and Alan Deere from New Zealand with 17 victories. The Spitfire continued to play increasingly diverse roles throughout the Second World War and beyond, often in air forces other than the RAF. The Spitfire, for example, became the first high-speed photo reconnaissance aircraft to be operated by the RAF. Sometimes unarmed, they flew at high, medium and low altitudes, often ranging far into enemy territory to closely observe the Axis powers and provide an almost continual flow of valuable intelligence information throughout the war. In 1941 and 1942, PRU Spitfires provided the first photographs of the Freya and Würzburg systems and, in 1943, helped confirm that the Germans were building the V1 and V2. In the Mediterranean the Spitfire blunted the attacks on Malta by the Italian Regia Aeronautica and German Luftwaffe and, from early 1943, helped pave the way for the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy. On 7th March 1942, 15 Mk Vs carrying 90-gallon fuel tanks under their bellies took off from HMS Eagle off the coast of Algeria on a 600-mile flight to Malta. Those Spitfires were the first to see service outside Britain. During WWII, Spitfires were used by the USAAF in the 4th Fighter Squadron until replaced by P-47 Thunderbolts in March 1943.
Lancaster Me262 Spitfire Mustang
Hurricane Me109 Flying Fortress Fw190

FREE PRINTS

Click here to claim a free print when you purchase an aviation print from our selection of over 100 prints!

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AIRCRAFT

Spitfire
Mustang
Me109
Lancaster
Hurricane
Flying Fortress
Fw190

New Aviation Packs
Low Cost Me262 Art Print Pack.
Defence

Defence of the Reich by Keith Woodcock.
Moskito-Jager

Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie.
Save £4!
Low Cost US Jet Aircraft Prints.
Desert

Desert Thunder by Keith Aspinall.
Fighting

Fighting Falcons by Keith Aspinall
Save £12!
Low Cost Aviation Art Prints by Keith Woodcock.
Wellingtons

Wellingtons by Keith Woodcock.
Stirlings

Stirlings Ready by Keith Woodcock.
Save £12!
Mosquito Aviation Art Print Pack.
Mosquitos

Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.
Night

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman.
Save £230!
Classic Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Hurricane

Hurricane Heroes by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £260!

Welcome to Aviation Prints .co.uk!  Use our drop down menus to find a particular aircraft, artist or signature, or click the links to the most popular in each category which we have provided above.  Browse through over 80 aviation artists, 120 different aircraft and well over 1500 aviation pilot and aircrew signatures.  Look out for our specially discounted two-print packs - especially designed for aviation art collectors, our packs bring together prints with the same aircraft, squadron, event or similar collectable signatures and offer large discounts off some of the latest releases and most popular prints.

At Aviation Prints .co.uk we hold 99% of the items advertised on our website in stock - our warehouse contains more stock than any other aviation art dealer, and we have over 1,000 print editions which are unavailable anywhere else.  We invest in aviation art by publishing artwork by a number of aviation artists ourselves - and we are also authorised distributors for other aviation art publishers, making our range of artwork the largest available.  With over 24 years of experience in the field of fine art, you can find the best deals around on aviation art at Aviation Prints .co.uk!

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